[Book] Magic 2.0

July 14, 2016 · Book Audiobook Science Fiction Fantasy

Book cover extract

Martin Banks is just a normal guy who has made an abnormal discovery: he can manipulate reality, thanks to reality being nothing more than a computer program. With every use of this ability, though, Martin finds his little “tweaks” have not escaped notice. Rather than face prosecution, he decides instead to travel back in time to the Middle Ages and pose as a wizard.

What could possibly go wrong?

I found the first (audio)book of this Magic 2.0 series written by Scott Meyer a few days ago and went through the first band "Off to be the wizard" in no time. The pixel-art cover makes it obvious: this book really plays well with our geeky / nerdy vibes.

The line between science-fiction and fantasy is very blurred but kept well balanced. In my opinion, the biggest strength of the book is its ability to play with our nerdy minds: what would you do with such powers? What would you conjure? How would you make yourself immortal? How could you make bigger and more impressive spells? Wondering how you could explain this or that magic trick with science? Twisting your mind with time travel, trying to find a crack in the grandfather paradox? All this I found in the book and many more...

I am now half-way through the second book, listening to it any time I can, and I already dread the moment I will be through with book #3. The fourth band "Fight and Flight" is apparently being written right now.

Geeky-Fantasy

In a way, this book reminds me of the children's book Augie and the green knight - written by Zachary Weiner (author of the webcomic SMBC) and illustrated by Boulet (French artist most well known for his webcomic Bouletcorp) - an adventure story about a scientifically precocious young girl in a world of fantasy.

This idea of going for magic without leaving any place to mystical elements is very enjoyable. It kind of soothes my Cartesian mind.

Do you have other book to share in this vein?

TL;DR; a book I highly recommend!

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